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Shooting Industry July 2012 Digital Edition - Page 30

Arms Arms and the woman Archery Sales Soar With Help From Hollywood race yourselves — archery is hot right now and its popularity should continue to skyrocket, thanks to some help from Hollywood. The recent archery craze began with the novel-turned-movieblockbuster The Hunger Games, and the main character’s skill with a bow. Katniss Everdeen is a strong character who took up a bow to feed her family, and ended up using it to save her life. Girls love her character, and they want to try archery so they can be like Katniss. Since there are plans for additional film installments to complete the book trilogy, this is a trend that could last several years. When the furor over this installment of The Hunger Games calms down, there’s another film featuring a girl archer immediately on its heels. The animated Disney movie Brave showcases a strong character who must use her bravery and archery skills to defeat a curse. This trend encompasses boys, as well, who will want to try archery after they see the comic-book-inspired film, The Avengers. One of the characters in the movie, Hawkeye, is billed as the World’s Best Archer. Lisa Parsons-Wraith B Recurve archer KC Cruz and compound archer Kaylee Geist are active in the JOAD program and fans of The Hunger Games. Cater To An Easy Niche f the youth archery market is something you want to get more involved in, now is the time. Many dealers are enjoying an increase in business as a result of archery’s positive portrayal in movies — and it’s an easy niche to cater to. Bill Pellegrino’s Archery Hut in Colorado Springs, Colo., has seen a definite increase in young girls coming in to try archery since The Hunger Games was released, said Kurt Geist, a sales associate at Bill Pellegrino’s. “They’re coming in with their Katniss hair braids, and want to shoot a bow like her,” Geist said. “Girls who come in because of the movie want to shoot like Katniss — the more traditional archery with a recurve bow.” They also want back quivers because they have an image in their heads of the heroine from the movie, he noted. Some of the girls who come in just want to try shooting a bow once, Geist said, but others get hooked. If there is a serious I Many storeowners are enjoying an increase in business as a result of archery’s positive portrayal in movies. interest in archery, he recommends one of the higher-end bows — such as the Mission Menace or Craze, or the Hoyt Ruckus — because they are very adjustable. The Archery Hut is very active with the Junior Olympic Archery Development Program (JOAD). This program teaches archery to young people in a series of classes taught by a certified archery instructor. JOAD encompasses both recurve and compound archery, and gives kids the chance to learn range safety and correct shooting techniques in a supportive atmosphere. JOAD is open to youth aged 8 to 20. JOAD archers who use a compound bow can train to compete in local and regional tournaments, and can earn a seat on a youth world team to compete in other countries representing the United States on behalf of USA Archery. Recurve archers get the added benefit of being able to use their recurve bow to try out for a spot on the U.S. Olympic Archery team, which is selected and managed by USA Archery. The program is hugely popular at the Archery Hut, according to Geist. “We have 40 kids in the program, and 40 on the waiting list,” he said. Bill Pellegrino’s Archery Hut in Colorado Springs, Colo., has seen a definite increase in young girls coming in to try archery since The Hunger Games was released. Continued on page 33 30 JULY 2012 Subscribe to SI DIGITAL www.shootingindustry.com

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