Click here to download the catalog as a PDF file.


Shooting Industry January 2012 Digital Edition - Page 32

Defense Personal Defense Market Help Your Customers Obtain Excellence Massad Ayoob O wners of general sporting goods stores know that customers hugely appreciate staff who can make them better at the game they play. Soon, that store becomes their home away from home. These customers like doing well at a pastime they enjoy doing, so they pursue the activity more. And, they buy their equipment from the shop that put them on the path to excellence. There’s no reason the same dynamic won’t work for the gun shop owner. Help the defensively oriented firearms owner become skilled and more competent at the armed defense — and you have a very happy customer on your hands. As an experienced dealer, you know that fitting the gun to the customer is extremely important. But even when a gun fits a customer perfectly and is suited to the given task, developing the skill to use the firearm isn’t simple. There just isn’t time for a full tutorial on shooting skills and deadly force between closing the sale and filling out the 4473. Therefore, the training side of the business should be considered a separate, aftermarket service. The red laser dot on target gives the shooter “biofeedback,” even in dry fire. Laser Sights Create Better Shooters oo many people consider laser sights to be gimmicks and crutches. As a longtime trainer, I can tell you the laser is not only ideal for certain customers with certain needs, but it is also extremely useful as a training device. Many of your customers, particularly some in the older set, have vision that allows them to clearly identify a threat, but does not permit them to focus on conventional gun sights. To them, the laser sight, particularly in poor light, is a godsend. Even a shooter with perfect vision will see a dramatic improvement of speed and accuracy in poor light with a good laser sight on their firearm. First, let’s look at the laser sight as a training tool. We all know that trigger control is “the heart of the beast,” in terms of hitting the target. What is the most common cause of bad hits? Without question, jerking the trigger. However, many “students” refuse to T believe they’re doing that. A pistol equipped with a laser is like a lie detector test. Here is a method of administering the test, which can be done dry firing, or with ball ammo and dummy rounds (live rounds interspersed with dummy cartridges). The firing distance should be close range, say 4 or 5 yards — so the student can easily see their laser dot on the target. As the gun “clicks” on an empty chamber or dummy round, they’ll see the red dot jerk downward — irrefutable evidence of trigger jerk. Recognizing the problem goes the majority of the way toward solving the problem. The laser sight can also be used to create a good trigger pull. Have the student put the laser dot on the target at reasonably close range, and focus his efforts on keeping the dot steadily there. (It will wiggle a little, of course. But it should only quiver around the point he wants to hit.) Now, instruct him to slowly roll the trigger back until the empty gun clicks, without the dot jerking off target. It’s kind of like biofeedback, and it’s a relatively simple exercise in hand-eye coordination. Very quickly, the student learns to keep the dot on target as faster and faster, as practice progresses, the trigger is pressed smoothly to the rear. It’s one of the best shortcuts I’ve found to teach good trigger control. It’ll work with any of the laser sight devices advertised in these pages: Crimson Trace, Insight, LaserMax, Streamlight, Viridian and others. If the customer just isn’t up for buying a laser, there’s a trick I call the Exemplar Drill that you can do dry-fire with any gun. Triple check that the gun is empty, while aiming it in a safe direction. Where’s that? Use a product Use The Exemplar Drill The Exemplar Drill in action, seen on a live fire range. 32 Continued on page 35 www.shootingindustry.com • NEW BUSINESS YEAR EXTRA 2012 Subscribe to SI DIGITAL

Page 31 ... Page 33